"This technique changed my life and I hope it will change yours!"

Here are a couple of hot topics that students often bring up:



Lots of singers, even professionals, take singing lessons because they experience pitch problems.  They are easy fixed with this vocal approach.   If your musical ear is fine, the issue is with one or more of the following:  1.  Lack of correct breath support.  2. Presence of moving vowels or lack of gradations.  3. Singing of improper or heavy consonants.

If one's musical ear is a contributing factor, one should do ear training for at least 5 minutes at day, focusing on melodic dictation.  Ear training of 5 minutes a day is more effective than 1 hour once a week. 


There exists a science that dictates how a beautiful tone is produced.  One of the things that can give a singer a gorgeous tone is the use of vocal resonances.  These resonances (Frontal sinus, Sphenoid sinus, Maxillary sinus and Ethmoid air cells) enhance phonation in quality of tone, intensity and color.  This results in a beautiful, rich and unique sound.   In contrast, resonating poorly will make one's voice sound thin and ordinary.  At "Beautiful Voice NJ" students spend of part of their private singing lesson learning how to resonate.



Here are a couple of basic things a singer can do to start building a bigger voice: use correct breathing method, engage vocal resonances and master singing on clean stationary vowels.  There is a common misconception about how to breathe.  Some believe that a singer needs to expand their ribcage out horizontally while inhaling.  That is incorrect.  This will result in various issues such as limited vocal range, pitch problems, a wobbly shaky vibrato and more.


Correct breathing for singers begins with a spontaneous open breath.  Upon inhalation, if ones hands are placed on the stomach - an inch below belly button, the hands will be pushed out by stomach muscles.  The singer's shoulders should be relaxed and not move up.  Neck and jaw should be relaxed.  Jaw needs to be unhinged.  Phonation begins with the movement of the stomach inward, where one is singing while pulling the stomach muscles in.  This is called "singing on the breath."  The phonation ends with the release of the abdominal muscles.  It's important to note that phonation should be ended with the release of the abs and not in one's throat, which is vocally abusive.


Vocal Tip:  A great way to isolate proper breathing muscles is to lie down on the floor on one's back and place a book over lower abs.  As a singer inhales, the book should be rising up.  This method is easy to execute and will give one a beautiful vibrato and an agile voice, capable of singing trill and turns.